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Making Sense Of DOT & FDA Regulations

Making Sense of FDA & DOT RegulationsRegulations can be not only hard to keep track of, but hard to make sense of at times, whether it’s FDA medical gas regulations, DOT driver regs, OSHA or other standards. Thankfully for GAWDA members, the association has enlisted its consultants to help simplify this Sisyphean task.

Yesterday, two of GAWDA’s consultants delivered a regulatory update for members. Rick Schweitzer, Government Affairs, Human Resources & Legal Consultant, updated members on the latest driver regulations, including hours of service, EOBRs and the Certified Medical Examiners Registry.

There seem to be quite a few regulations up in the air as it relates to drivers in the gases and welding industry. One such issue is the tank vehicle definition. FMCSA quietly redefined its definition of tank vehicle in a way that would have required distributors hauling cylinders or tanks above a certain quantity to obtain a tank vehicle endorsement, even if the trucks are not carrying hazardous materials. With the rule having faced a great deal of criticism, Schweitzer reports that FMCSA will reconsider the tank definition. There’s only one problem. Several states have already started enforcing the new definition (they were not required to enforce it until 2014), creating confusion and an additional burden. It may be within their right, but is it fair for states to enforce a rule that’s under review?

There’s also quite a bit of regulatory anticipation on the medical gas side, as reported by FDA, Medical Gases and Specialty Gas Consultant Tom Badstubner. As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, there have been discussions about whether medical gases should be regulated differently than other drugs. But aside from the regulatory uncertainty of medical gases, distributors of food-grade gases face an increasingly uphill terrain. As Badstubner explained, food gas distributors are now being looked at as food producers, and as such, are inspected as though they ran a bakery. This means distributors may need to keep logs of cleanliness and check for infestations much like a bakery.

I’m only skimming the surface of the regulatory issues at hand. As Schweitzer and Badstubner pointed out, part of members dues’ pays for access to the consultants. So if you have regulatory questions, they are a great resource. GAWDA’s consultants also each write a regular column in Welding & Gases Today, which are all available online. Find answers to your regulatory questions in the Consultants’ Corner Archive.

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